Space Mutiny (1988)

Oh. Boy.

Welcome back to B-Movie Enema and the grand finale of David Winters Winter. If you’ve been reading all month, I’ve been kind of teasing what the finale was going to be. If you know what David Winters is maybe best known for, particularly in the 80s, and if I was teasing an 80s film of his that has some questionable decisions made in the production and set decoration, then you had to know it was going to be Space Mutiny.

Of course, Space Mutiny is best known for being one of the funniest episodes of Mystery Science Theater 3000. And what that episode is best known for are all the muscleman jokes made at lead star Reb Brown’s expense. I cannot tell you how many times I’ve called someone Rip Steakface, or Brick HardMeat, or Crunch Buttsteak, or Reef Blastbody, or Roll Fizzlebeef, or Big McLargeHuge, or Eat Punchbeef, or even Bob Johnson. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve said one of those names when I see Reb Brown. In fact, I’m sure I used some of them when I covered the 1979 Captain America movie he starred in! It’s part of my very blood. Those 40 parody names are just some of the best jokes ever written for a TV show.

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Enforcer from Death Row (1978)

We’ve come to the end of a loosely connected, months-long, trio of reviews that featured the late, great Leo Fong.

Welcome to B-Movie Enema. This week, I’m going to take a look at 1978’s Enforcer from Death Row. This film comes pretty early in Fong’s career as an actor. While we are accepting the fact that this movie was released in 1978 and was called Enforcer from Death Row, the film is also listed on IMDb as Ninja Assassins with the date of 1976. Some of this can be explained by a couple factors at play with this movie.

First, the 70s were kind of known for a couple things when it came to film distribution. You had independent studios cranking out low budget movies and then shopping them for distribution. That distribution, especially for movies like these kung fu/exploitation/low budget action flicks would land the films either at drive-ins or in grindhouse theaters. Second, this was a movie made in the Philippines. That was kind of a southeast Asian haven for films to be made quick and on the cheap in the late 60s and 70s. There are some very fine, if not extremely simple, movies that came out of the area during this time.

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Killpoint (1984)

Let’s get back into some action stuff and reunite with Leo Fong in Frank Harris’ 1984 action spectacular Killpoint!

This week’s B-Movie Enema article is the second of three new Leo Fong features celebrating this action star this year. Just about five or six weeks ago, I featured Blood Street on the blog, which itself is a sequel to his endlessly enjoyable Low Blow. Later this year, I will take a look at one from the mid 70s. But this week, with Killpoint, we see Fong teamed up with Low Blow co-star Cameron Mitchell as well as director Frank Harris. Here’s hoping we get some of that Low Blow fun feel in this movie too.

Frank Harris only directed films from 1983, Killpoint being his first, to 1990. He was better known for being a camera guy and a cinematographer. In fact, with both this film and 1986’s Low Blow, Harris is pulling down double duty as both director and cinematographer. Outside of those two films, the only other one that immediately jumped out to me on his filmography was as the cinematographer for 1996’s Skyscraper starring Anna Nicole Smith. In television, he worked as cinematographer for several episodes of 2009’s kids’ tokusatsu show Kamen Rider: Dragon Knight. Harris passed away in April 2020 at the age of 76.

Okay, But now, let’s talk about Cameron Mitchell…

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Action U.S.A. (1989)

Ah…  The good ol’ U.S.ofA.  It’s a sort of cool place, right?  I mean, we are THE country in the world that most people in other countries care more about than their own.  You don’t have to go too far into the rabbit hole of YouTube to find a Canadian guy, British guy, German guy, or a French Canadian guy to see they will release screeds and commentaries about the United States and what’s going on over here.

Then there was the 80s.  If you were around in the 80s, there were a few things that you probably knew:

  1. REAGANOMICS!
  2. COCAINE!
  3. USA! USA! USA!
  4. ACTION!
  5. Fuckin’ Commies trying to take over our country and stuff.

So what better way to celebrate all of that than to close out the decade with a movie called Action U.S.A.? Continue reading “Action U.S.A. (1989)”

Deadly Prey (1987)

I’m a little surprised it has taken me this long to get to a David A. Prior movie, but here we are!  This week’s B-Movie Enema is going to tackle Deadly Prey from 1987.  There’s lots of interesting elements to talk about here.  But we should start with Prior first.

Prior was born in 1955.  In the early 80s, he made the movie Sledgehammer which has the distinction of being the very first shot-on-video slasher film that was distributed to the masses.  In relatively quick succession, he was making films that would have limited theatrical releases, but had lots of life on cable and in video stores.  Before making this film, he met David Winters (more on him shortly).  Winters would finance a couple of Prior’s movies like Killzone and Killer Workout (both movies I’d very much like to cover here).  After those films, Winters and Prior would form Action International Pictures (AIP) to release two more Prior films shot back-to-back – Mankillers and Deadly Prey.

David Prior often worked with his little brother, Ted Prior.  Ted became pretty well known for being a buff action type star.  Ted had roles in almost every AIP film that David was heavily involved in beyond being a producer.  Interesting note about Ted, he was briefly married to a female bodybuilder who was part of the original cast of American Gladiators (Raye Hollitt aka Zap). Continue reading “Deadly Prey (1987)”

Mutant War (1988)

Last week, I checked in on site favorite Norman J. Warren.  This week, it’s time to check in with another favorite of the site, Brett Piper.

Toward the end of 2019, I wrote about his fun, sci-fi, post-apocalyptic, alien invasion flick Battle for the Lost Planet from 1985.  This time around, let’s look at the 1988 sequel – Mutant War.  Whereas the first movie finds our hero Harry Trent first remembering a series of events that started with him hijacking a space shuttle to being stuck on a pre-planned, five-year course to finally returning to Earth to discover that aliens have landed and more or less messed things up pretty bad.  It made for a nice little movie that, at times, gave me real classic Doctor Who vibes.

As was the case with his later film, Drainiac, and, to a certain degree, They Bite, I appreciate the spirit in which Piper works with and his general effort he puts out for the movies.  I truly do get the feeling that Piper just likes making movies and he doesn’t take himself too seriously.  Good on him.  In truth, he mostly just likes doing effects and creatures, which is obvious in his movies.  That said, sometimes, you just need these little types of movies that don’t take themselves very seriously and just wants to entertain. Continue reading “Mutant War (1988)”

The Toolbox Murders (1978)

Bit by bit by bit… He carved a nightmare!

That’s what the promotional materials said to sell this week’s featured B-Movie Enema movie, The Toolbox Murders.  It was also marketed as a dramatization of a true crime spree perpetrated by a serial killer.  Think of it like what Tobe Hooper did with The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.  In fact, scratch that…  This movie is directly connected with The Texas Chainsaw Massacre in a much more direct way.

It’s not like anyone making The Toolbox Murders were associated with TCM.  Oh no…  This is classic exploitation sleaze that will forever connect these two movies.   You see, producer Tony Didio noticed that a second release of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre in 1977 was particularly successful.  So, he decided he wanted in on that.  He showed the movie to his writers and told them one simple thing:

“Gimme something exactly like that chainsaw movie.” Continue reading “The Toolbox Murders (1978)”

Night Train to Terror (1985)

Damn you, Vinegar Syndrome

You release so many movies that I need to not only see, but also write about in near manic volume.  This time around, not only do you have me at a movie that I remember seeing constantly at video stores in the 80s and 90s, but you also have me going all in on an anthology flick.  This is new levels of villainy, VS.

But not only that, this week’s feature, Night Train to Terror, is infamously known as being among some of the hammiest and worst cinema could possibly offer.  What’s curious is that this movie isn’t without some interesting people.  There’s B-Movie awesome guy, Cameron Mitchell.  That seems pretty solid.  I’ve seen lots of his work.  There’s also John Phillip Law.  He was in Barbarella.  Together, Law and Mitchell were in Space Mutiny!  How could this possibly be bad? Continue reading “Night Train to Terror (1985)”